Thursday, July 2, 2009

Mosquito Repellent Plants

Mosquito Repellent Plants

AgeratumAs summer fast approaches, I would like to suggest plants that will repel mosquitoes in your landscape and how to use these plants to enjoy the outdoors during summer. In addition to the plants that repel mosquitoes I would like to suggest additional, eco-friendly ways to keep mosquitoes from your outdoor living spaces. The picture on the left is Ageratum.

Some areas of the southeast have had drought busting rainstorms and even with the tremendous amounts of rainfall, these areas are still considered to beBasil under drought conditions. With the severe amounts of rainfall that comes into an area, and the warmer temperatures of the season that is a sure sign the pesky mosquito is not far behind. The picture on the right is Basil.

The plants that I am suggesting will repel mosquitoes from your outdoor living space. There are a few suggestions when planning to use the plants mentioned to enhance the natural repelling abilities:

v Use the plants in containers around your patio, deck, or outdoor living space such as patio tables and chairs.

v Use the plants in containers or planted in the ground by your front door and your back door.

v Lemon Grass is the #1 recommended plant to grow in the landscape and in containers to use around your patio, deck or outdoor living spaces to repel mosquitoes during the summer.

v Before having outdoor activities brush the Lemon Grass to release more of its fragrance.

v Lemon Grass can be used in cooking.

Here are a few suggestions recommended to do in addition to using the recommended plants:

v Fix all outdoor facets that drip.

v Drain your birdbath twice a week and refill your birdbath.

v Turn your empty outside pots and containers upside down to prevent the containers from collecting water.

v Drain your plant saucers that collect water once a week, mosquitos lay their eggs in stagnant water.

v To reduce numerous other flying insects, including mosquitoes, plant marigolds in containers or in the landscape.

Cadaga TreeThere are additional benefits to adding mosquito-repelling plants to your landscape. A few of the benefits are that the mixture of plants listed can be used in addition to repelling mosquitoes, but also used as herbs in cooking, the trees listed will attract additional wildlife such as birds to the garden to give natural predators of mosquitoes a safe heaven, the majority of the plants are nectar and larval food plants for butterflies in your area, and the Silver Dollar Tree can be used in your fresh cut flower arrangements as greens. The picture on the left is Cadaga Tree.

Ageratum or Floss Flower: Ageratum houstonianum. Type: Annual. Height: 6-12”. Spacing: 6-8” apart. Light Requirement: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: Butterfly nectar plant.

Basil: Ocimum basilicum. Type: Annual. Height: 2 feet. Spacing: 18-24” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: Butterfly nectar plant, the leaves are used in cooking. Click To Purchase.

Cadaga Tree: Eucalyptus torelliana. Type: Tree. Height: To 80 feet. Spacing: 20-30 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun. Additional Uses: Attracts wildlife to the garden.

Catmint: Nepeta faassenii. Type: Perennial. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 12-18 “ apart. Additional Uses: Butterfly nectar plant, and your catsCatmint will love it. The picture on the right is Catmint.

Catnip: Nepeta cataria. Type: Perennial. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 12-18 “ apart. Additional Uses: Butterfly nectar plant, and your cats will love it.

Citronella Grass: Cymbopogon nardus. Type: Perennial in USDA Zones 9 and 10, annual outside zone 9. Height: 5-6 feet. Spacing: 3-5 feet Catnipapart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: The oil from the plant is used in citronella candles. The picture on the left is Catnip.

Clove Tree: Syzygium aromaticum. Type: Tree. Height: 20-30 feet. Spacing: 25 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: The flower buds are the spice of commerce, and attracts wildlife to the garden.

Horsemint or Lemon Beebalm: Monarda citriodora. Type: Perennial. Height: 12-30”. Spacing: 12-24” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: The flowers can be used in fresh cut arrangements, nectar plant for butterflies and hummingbirds.

Lavender: Lavandula angustifolia. Type: Perennial. Height: 18-24”. Spacing: 12-18” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: Nectar plant for butterflies, flowers can be dried, in potpourris, and sachets.

Lemon Balm: Melissa officinalis. Type: Perennial. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 12-18” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: All leaves can be used in potpourris, flavor hot and iced teas, and used as a substitute for lemon peel in cooking.

Lemon Grass: Cymbopogon citrates. Type: Perennial to USDA zone 8, treat as an annual elsewhere. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: The leaves are used in cooking. Clove Tree

Lemon Scented Geranium: Pelargonium crispum. Type: Perennial. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 12” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: Nectar plant for butterflies, leaves are used in cooking, in potpourris, and sachets. The picture on the right is Clove Tree.

Lemon Verbena: Aloysia triphylla. Type: Perennial to USDA zone 8, treat as an annual elsewhere. Height: To 4 feet. Spacing: 18-24” apart. Light Lemon GrassRequirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: The oil is used in perfumes; the leaves are used in flavoring teas and jellies. The picture on the left is Lemon Grass.

Mexican Marigold Mint: Tagetes lucida. Type: Perennial. Height: 24-30”. Spacing: 12-18” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: Butterfly nectar and larval food plant, fresh flowers are used in salads, leaves are used as a substitute for French tarragon.

Mindanao Gum Tree: Eucalyptus deglupta. Type: Tree. Height: To 225 feet. Spacing: 30 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: Attracts wildlife to the garden.

Pennyroyal: Mentha pulegium. Type: Perennial. Height: 6-12”. Spacing: 12” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: A groundcover, nectar plant for butterflies, the leaves are used in the flavoring for fish dishes.

Peppermint: Mentha piperita. Type: Perennial. Height: 24-36”. Spacing: 12-18” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: Leaves are used fresh in hot and iced teas, butterfly nectar and larval food plant. Mexican Marigold Mint

Pitcher Plant: Nepenthes alata. Type: Herbaceous perennial. Height: To 14 feet, usually grown in a hanging basket. Spacing: N/A. Light Requirements: Partial shade to shade. Additional Uses: Will attract and capture all types of pesky insects from your garden. The plant is available Mindanao Gumat local garden centers in hanging baskets and can be placed in tree limbs or placed on patio plant stands. The plant uses the insects it captures as fertilizer. The picture on the left is Mindanao Gum, and the picture on the right is Mexican Marigold Mint.

Prostrate Rosemary: Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostrates'. Type: Perennial shrub or groundcover. Height: 12-18”. Spacing: 2 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: The leaves are used in lamb and fish dishes, butterfly nectar plant, drought tolerant plant.

Red-Flowering Gum Tree: Eucalyptus ficifolia. Type: Tree. Height: 25-30 feet. Spacing: 20-25 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun. Additional Uses: After establishment in the landscape the tree is very drought tolerant, the leaves are fragrant, attracts wildlife to the garden, very showy red flowers in spring and summer.

Roman Wormwood: Artemisia pontica. Type: Perennial. Height: 18-24”. Spacing: 12” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun. Additional Uses: Nectar and larval food plant for butterflies, drought tolerant plant.

Rosemary: Rosmarinus officinalis. Type: Perennial shrub. Height: 4 feet. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: The leaves are used in lamb and fish dishes, drought tolerant plant, and butterfly nectar plant.

Silver Dollar Tree: Eucalyptus cinerea. Type: Tree. Height: To 20 feet. Spacing: 25 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun. Additional Uses: Attracts wildlife to the garden, the foliage is used in fresh cut flower arrangements as greens, and dried floral arrangements.Pitcher Plant

Tansy: Tanacetum vulgare. Type: Perennial. Height: 3-4 feet. Spacing: 12-18” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Prostrate RosemaryUses: Nectar food plant for butterflies. The picture on the left is Prostrate Rosemary, and the picture on the right is Pitcher Plant.

Wormwood: Artemisia absinthium. Type: Perennial. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 18-24” apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: Nectar and larval food plant for butterflies, drought tolerant plant.

Wormwood: Artemisia 'Powis Castle'. Type: Perennial. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 3 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: Nectar and larval food plant for butterflies, drought tolerant plant.

Mosquitos

I find this to be a great subject to start, what shall be my award winning series delving into monthly newsletters.

RosemaryI find the little bloodsuckers to be a nemesis of all that is true to babes, beer and bar-b-que.

First of all Babes….Guys, these are the women that you married, the ones that come complaining to you because these little critters (mosquito’s) are flying around sucking on all the friends that your babe invited to your palatial kingdom for an afternoon/evening of food and festivities. Not only are they sucking on flesh that well…we’ll leave that to your imagination. Obviously this is a problem that you will have to deal with to keep your babe..shall we say babe-o-lisous (after the party clean up). (The picture on the left is Rosemary.)

Next Beer…. With mosquito’s this should not be much of a problem, as it would take a pretty darn big mosquito to wrestle a good cold beer from one of YOUR buddies (if not get bigger buddies). If a large mosquito did manage to do that I’m sure your buddy would kill it, take his beer back and suck the blood out of him just for fun. Texas style.Silver Dollar Tree

Finally Bar-b-que…. This also should not be much of a problem, when you have a good smoking fire going. Most of the mosquitos that I hang out with (and I have been known to do such) do not like flying around in smoke unless they are at Snoop Dog’s party!!!! Keep the pit going good, hot and long (he, he) and the little flying blood donation receptacles will probably stay away. (The picture on the right is Silver Dollar Tree.)

Please note that the aforementioned plants in this newsletter have been known to keep the little flying critters away. Also you always have your local mega mart to help you with the problem. If you do have to go your mega store please mention hibiscusandmore.com as they have no idea who we are, but we are trying our best to make your gardening/after gardening experience all that it can be. (The picture on the left is Silver Dollar Tree - Leaves.)

Silver Dollar Leaves

With peace for all and grounded roots,

H I Biscus

Editor’s Note:

Mr. Biscus will be here indefinitely. We would appreciate all comments and concerns to be voiced through your registration and e-mail to cheryl@hibiscusandmore.com. As always your comments on products are always welcome through your membership at www.hibiscusandmore.com Tansy

Hibiscus and More announces lower shipping rates for the entire store. The more you purchase on a single order the more you will save at checkout. Click Here to Visit The Store. The picture on the right is Tansy.

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All photographs and digital images are ©Cheryl Ann Meola 2009. All Rights Reserved. All photographs and digital images displayed in this article are for viewing purposes only and cannot be duplicated. Place your cursor over the picture for the plant name.

43 comments:

  1. This was great information on natural mosquito repellents. Take it from someone living on the coast of Texas, we have some very large mosquito clouds here and we need all the help we can get. I am looking forward to planting some of these plants. Thanks

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    1. I'm from Texas also and have been to the coast many times over the years and we don't just have very large mosquitos, we have little vampires...lol lol...fangs and all...:D hope your plants all helped with getting rid of them or at least keeping them at bay...

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  3. I’m glad that I read your post since I’ll be changing the plants in my garden. I guess it’s a nice idea having one of these plants in the yard to repel mosquitoes. Mosquitoes really annoy me and I guess these plants can help me to clear out the mosquitoes.

    [ Maurise Gelman ]

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  4. I have been contemplating just what to do with my big back yard. Right now it is "just there". This gives me some great ideas to spruce it up and make it a great place to relax and finally really enjoy.

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  5. Excellent practical information. Lot of people have a feeling that plants attract mosquitoes, and dislike greenery near their house. Are really there are plants that attract mosquitoes?

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  6. What a great list! May I pin this on Pinterest?

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    1. I want to pin this as well.How do I go about pinning this to Pintrest?

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    2. I have woods on both sides of where I live and a BIG did I say BIG bog in the back that drains to a big ditch sometimes. Will this keep the five million mosquito away from my backyard if I plant some of these plants?

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  7. What about no seeums or better known as sand gnats? Any suggestions

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  8. I will have to do some research in that area, but if the sand gnats are directly relayed to the mosquito I think that the plants would work.

    Thanks for visiting. Cheryl

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  9. What repels one critter usually repels many. The hot chili powder I put around my plants got rid of the ants and the squirrels. I have catnip, ageratum, basil and spearmint and peppermint on the deck. I didn't know they were mosquito repellent when I put them there. Think I'll move them around so they surround the deck better. Thanks for the info

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  10. I have seen a video of a guy in Florida who puts wire mesh over an exhaust fan. The fan sucks the mosquitoes onto the mesh, and he then feeds mosquito bodies to his chickens. I don't have chickens, but I do recall when my dad moved to the FL Keys, he rented until he figured out the trade winds protect the east side of Marathon, and the Gulf side has the mosquitoes. He bought on the Atlantic side, in the end.

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  11. i am so glad i read about the plants that repel mosquitoes. i will pass on this info. thanks, susan

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  12. I cannot tell you how much this information is appreciated. I will be buying these plants for our patio TOMORROW!

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  13. Thanks for this information.Can these plants be grown in pots and in North India? Are u delivering in India?

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    1. Yes the plants can grow in pots, but I am sorry I can not ship to India.

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  14. Thanks for the info! check this out for other effective herbal mosquito reppelent.
    http://katziem.blogspot.com/2013/07/wildcard-herbal-mosquito-repellent.html

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  15. This is awesome! We have the worst mosquito problem where I live so I have been wanting to plant those in my yard. I'm also looking into finding natural insect repellent because I hate using the sticky store bought stuff all the time. Darn mosquitoes.

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  16. Thank you so much. We have woods behind our fence and a large pool and HUGE mosquitos! Since I have plenty of yard around the pool, I am going to go find as many of these plants as I can and do some much needed landscaping! BTW, peppermint also repels spiders!

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  17. I live in Argyll in Scotland and we have the mosquitos cousin the mossie size of a pin head and bite of a shark....lol will try some of these plants out.....

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  18. Maybe I missed it but I was sure that Melissa and Jasmine were also natural repellants.
    Anyways I have a bunch of these plants and those buggers still seek me out, my grandma has always told me to rub fresh parsley in a pesky mosquito bite and it actually soothes immediately.
    Cheers

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  19. Are any of these plants toxic to domestic cats or dogs?

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  21. Wow, so there are plants that are mosquito repellent. I would love to have them at my place.
    Thank you so much for sharing this useful information.
    http://www.home2garden.co.uk/

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  22. What repels one critter usually repels many.You may be scared of visiting the beaches of Melbourne due to the attacks of the sand flies. Now there is no need to be scared of as we bring for you the most effective
    Sandfly
    Repellent
    .

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  23. These plants are must-haves for homeowners that have gardens, pools, and bird baths at their front/backyard. If you can’t get rid of them, we could at least keep them away with this repellent. We could also enforce pest control by destroying their breeding sites by cleaning and using environmentally safe pesticides and solutions. Jeffrey @ BugManiacs

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  24. Wow, so there are plants that are mosquito repellent. I would love to have them at my place.

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  25. What zones are applicable for these suggestions? - we are up near the Minnesota/Canada border......

    Nancy - chicagoboots@gmail.com

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    1. You would have to treat all the plants listed as annuals.

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  26. Heck!!! I have a huge number of those on that list - especially the eucalyptus, the mints, rosemaries, basil, catmint, a huge amount of lavender along with lemon grass and lemon verbena - and I am still being bitten alive. I think I am a bug magnet :(

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    1. Yes Susan, some people for whatever the reason seem to attract mosquito's and other biters more than others. I can sit outside with my daughter and never get a bite and my daughter sit right next to me and be EATEN ALIVE. I once thought she had chicken pox after being in her baby pool because she had bites EVERYWHERE, I had none. Sorry to hear you are like my daughter. I am glad to find this info as we just built a patio and am looking for ways to make it livable for her. I am on my way to buy a bunch of these tomorrow! Good luck to you!!

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    2. yes- me too I have a actually been out in a friends garden enjoying a few beers - and we were surrounded by citronella candles yet I had my very own personal cloud of midges- everybody found this very amusing as you can imagine- and people used to invite me to barbecues and such just because of it - if I was there it was always safe for everyone else glad to know there's a way I can get out and enjoy the summer evenings now...

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  27. I have most of these planted near (by near I mean right up against) my house & not a single one of them work. It doesn't matter how many plants there are, the blood suckers just laugh at humans feeble attempts to naturally repel them.

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  28. Thank you for providing this information. My nest trip for plants will have a new and long list. I have always been a smorgasbord for every mosquito within a mile! Maybe after I get these plants, I'll be able to enjoy my porch on the cool (I hope) summer nights. I was just considering buying a tent when I read this!

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  29. ANOTHER GREAT TIP: i use a pant mister and fill it with water add 2-3 drops of lemon grass oil and spray my entire yard, around the pool, and my entire garden. it keeps mosquito away plus any other bug! i have also planted several pots of lemongrass and recently planted seeds for several other herbs listed above! i can't wait for them to grow now! thanks!.

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  30. Pure vanilla extract, 50/50 with water in a spray bottle.

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  31. Have a look at our repellents reviewing website http://repellently.com - I will surely update it using some info I found here.

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  32. There is no evidence that plants growing in the garden repel mosquitoes. the plant on the list that is most likely to work is lemon grass and it only works if you rub it on your skin or extract the juices from the plant.
    for mor on this topic see http://www.gardenmyths.com/citronella-plant-keeps-mosquitoes-away/

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  33. No one mentioned BATS! they eat millions of bugs, including mosquitos and dreaded STINK BUG. PLEASE make sure you get the correct bat house for the BATS IN YOUR AREA. follow mounting instructions. East coast has a great wellmade one at Bushtail Creek> facebook.com/bushtailcreek a local small business.

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