Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Gardening and Artistic Gifts

Christmas and Holiday Gift Ideas

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from Hibiscus and More, at Hibiscus and More we offer a fine selection of gardening and artistic Mini Bird Bath Dragonflygifts for all your shopping needs. Please feel free to browse our online catalog to find the perfect gift(s): Bird Baths, Bird Feeders, Bird Christmas Blooming Coe SteinwartHouses, Cedar Planters, Cedar Pet Food Storage Containers, Coe Steinwart Garden Flags, Hummingbird Feeders, Coe Steinwart Dinner Place Matts, Solar Garden Lights, Watercolor Paintings by Coe Steinwart, Wind Chimes, and Wind Spinners.
Visit our online store for more gardening merchandise.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays,

Hibiscus and More



Monday, December 9, 2013

Coe Steinwart Luggage Tags

Coe Steinwart Luggage Tags
Let's mark each piece of your luggage with one of Coë's watercolor paintings! Yes, each luggage tag is a print of an original painting and will make a great Christmas gift Coe Steinwart Luggage Tag 1Coe Steinwart Luggage Tagto someone special.....or to yourself! Order yours now..... You’ll love them! Each luggage tag is a 4" x 2 3/4" made from fiberglass-reinforced plastic and is great for luggage, kennels or anything that needs identifying with a splash of color or artistic flair. The reverse side has a form for Name, Address, City, State, Zip and Phone number. Includes leather strap for attaching to your luggage or bag.
Or, contact her directly by email at coe@coesteinwart.com to make an appointment to visit her studio.

Monday, November 4, 2013

Coe Steinwart Place Matts

Coe Steinwart Place Matts

How about a brand new set of place matts to liven up your Thanksgiving table?  And each of them will be printed from one of Coë's original watercolor paintings?  Order yours now ..... you'll love them!  Or, contact her directly by email at coe@coesteinwart.com to make an appointment Coe Steinwart Place Mattsto visit her studio.
You can also visit with Coe at one of her shows this season!

Sprayberry Craft Show, Sprayberry High School 2525 Sandy Plains Rd, Marietta GA November 23-24.

Apple Annie Arts & Crafts Show Catholic Church of Saint Ann, Marietta GA December 5-7.

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Coe Steinwart Garden Flags

Coe Steinwart Garden Flags

A warm October sun is shining on our gardens even though some of the summer color has gone. Just the right time for one of Coë's bright garden flags to liven things up! Click to purchase Coe’s Garden Flags. Or, contact her directly by email at coe@coesteinwart.com Cones in Pink Coe Steinwart Garden Flagsto make an appointment to visit her studio.
You can also visit with Coe at one of her shows this season!

Marist Holiday Traditions, The Marist School, 3790 Ashford Dunwoody Rd NE, Atlanta, GA October 26.

Sprayberry Craft Show, Sprayberry High School 2525 Sandy Plains Rd, Marietta GA November 23-24.

Apple Annie Arts & Crafts Show Catholic Church of Saint Ann, Marietta GA December 5-7.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Coe Steinwart Watercolor Paintings

Coe Steinwart Watercolor Paintings
Coe Steinwart invites you to visit her “sunlit world of watercolor painting”! Enjoy browsing through examples of her colorful work and feel free to make a purchase via her web site, or contact her directly by email at coe@coesteinwart.com to make an appointment to visit her studio. Coe Steinwart Watercolors
You can also visit with Coe at one of her shows this season!
Art in the Park - Glover Park, Marietta GA August 31-September 2.
Roswell Arts Festival on the Square, Roswell GA September 21-22.
Marist Holiday Traditions, The Marist School, 3790 Ashford Dunwoody Rd NE, Atlanta, GA October 26.
Sparyberry Craft Show, Sprayberry High School 2525 Sandy Plains Rd, Marietta GA November 23-24.
Apple Annie Arts & Crafts Show Catholic Church of Saint Ann, Marietta GA December 5-7
   Coe Steinwart Watercolors               

Rabbit Resistant Plants

Rabbit Resistant Plants
As gardeners we would envision our garden as the prettiest on the street, but nature sometimes intervenes with bugs and rabbits. Rabbits have been a major nuisance this year to gardeners and these creatures can destroy a plant or plants overnight. Unfortunately, there is not a plant that is 100 percent rabbit proof, because if the rabbits are hungry enough they will eat any plant. Rabbits do not like foliage that is rough in texture, pubescent foliage, lemony or scented foliage. The plants listed below has one or all of the foliage characteristics, and to combat the rabbits, I would like to suggest using the plants listed below in beds and borders, but also use a rabbit repellent on your property line. Some of the plants listed have a * image, which means that some rabbits sometimes have a little nibble. Plants listed with a spp. ending represents all varieties in that genus.
Anemones, Windflowers - Anemone spp. Type: Perennial corms. Zones: 4–9. Height: 4–36 inches depending on variety. Spacing: 6–12 inches apart depending on variety. Light: Full to partial shade. Uses: Cut flowers, containers, beds and borders, fragrant flowers.
Angelonia – Angelonia angustifolia. Type: Perennial in zones 9-10, annual outside zone 9. Zones: All. Height: 12-24 inches. Spacing: 10-12 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Containers, beds and borders, attracts butterflies to the garden.
Anise Hyssop - Agastache spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-9. Height: 12-36 inches. Spacing: 12-24 inches. Light: Full sun. Uses: Beds and borders, fragrant flowers, attract hummingbirds and butterflies to the garden.
Arkansas Blue Star - Amsonia hubrichtii. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-8. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 2-3 feet apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Attracts butterflies, good fall color, beds and borders.
Aster – Aster spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 2-5 feet. Spacing: 15 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Beds and borders, mass plantings, cut flowers, attract butterflies.
Avens, Grecian Rose - Geum spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-7. Height: 10-24 inches. Spacing: 10-12 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Beds and borders, fresh cut flowers.
Azalea - Rhododendron spp. Type: Shrub. Zones: 4-9. Height: Varies from 2-20 feet depending on variety and cultivar. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light: Full sun to shade. Uses: AzaleaSpecimen shrub, hedge shrub, smaller varieties can be used in borders, nectar plant for butterflies.
Balloon Flower - Platycodon grandiflorus. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 6-36 inches depending on cultivar. Spacing: 8-12 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Border, rock garden, cut flower, containers.
Basil – Ocimum basilicum. Type: Annual. Zones: 2-11. Height: 1-2 feet. Spacing: 12-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: BasilLeaves are used in cooking, pesto sauces, Italian dishes, butterfly nectar plant, mosquito repellant plant.
Bear’s Breeches - Acanthus spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 6-11. Height: 3-4 feet. Spacing: 2-4 feet. Light: Partial shade to shade. Uses: Specimen plant, cut flowers, dramatic foliage.
Beardtongue – Penstemon spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-10. Height: 12-36 inches. Spacing: 18-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Mixed perennial garden, attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.
Bee Balm – Monarda didyma. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 2-4 feet, but can reach to 6 feet. Spacing: 18-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Attract butterflies and hummingbirds.
Bee Balms - Monardia spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 1-4 feet, but can reach to 6 feet. Spacing: 18-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Attract butterflies and hummingbirds, containers, beds and borders, cut flowers.
Big-leaf Periwinkle - Vinca major. Type: Ground cover. Zones: 5-9. Height: 12-18 inches. Spacing: 18 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Excellent ground cover for retaining walls or hillsides.
Black-eyed Susan – Rudbeckia spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-10. Height: 18-30 inches. Spacing: 12-24 inches. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Beds and borders, containers, attract birds and butterflies.
Blanket Flower - Gaillardia spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-10. Height: 18-24 inches. Spacing: 18 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Borders, containers, cut flowers, attracts butterflies.
Bleeding Heart – Dicentra spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: 24-36 inches. Spacing: 18-24 inches apart. Light: Partial shade to shade. Uses: Borders, containers, cut flowers.
Blue Heliotrope, Clasping Heliotrope - Heliotropium amplexicaule. Type: Perennial. Zones: 7-10. Height: 12 inches. Spacing: 24-36 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Ground cover, in containers, mixed perennial garden, attracts butterflies.
Blue Mist Shrub, Bluebeard - Caryopteris spp. Type: Deciduous shrub. Zones: 5-9. Height: 24-36 inches. Spacing: 18-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Attracts butterflies, borders, fragrant flowers.
Butterfly Bush - Buddleia davidii. Type: Deciduous shrub. Zones: 5-10. Height: From 3-6 feet depending on variety. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Attracts Butterfly Bushbutterflies and hummingbirds, fragrant flowers, specimen shrub.
Butterfly Weed, Milkweed - Asclepias spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-11. Height: 24-36 inches. Spacing: 12-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Nectar and food plant for the Monarch butterfly, cut flowers, borders, wildflower gardens, containers.
Canna Lily – Canna X generalis. Type: Perennial. Zones: 7-11. Height: 4-6 feet. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light: Full sun to Cannapartial shade. Uses: Plant in masses with bananas and gingers for a touch of the tropics, containers, cut flower, and wetlands or boggy areas.
Catmint – Nepeta X faassenii. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-10. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Butterfly nectar plant, front borders, your cat will love it.
Catmints/Catnips - Nepeta spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-10. Height: 12-36 inches. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: CatmintFull sun. Uses: Butterfly nectar plant, front borders, your cat will love it.
Clematis – Clematis spp. Type: Perennial vine. Zones: 4-9. Height: 6-10 feet. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light: Full sun and keep the roots in the shade. Uses: Trellises, arbors, mailboxes.
Common Periwinkle, Dwarf Periwinkle - Vinca minor. Type: Evergreen ground cover. Zones: 4-9. Height: 4-6 inches. Spacing: 8-12 inches apart. Light: Full sun to shade. Uses: Ground cover for erosion control, hillsides, retaining walls, slopes.
Coneflower – Echinacea spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 2-10. Height: 24-36 inches. Spacing: 15-20 inches apart. Light: Full Coneflowersun to partial shade. Uses: Borders or containers, cut flowers, attracts birds, butterflies and hummingbirds.
Coppertip, Falling Stars - Crocosmia spp. Type: Perennial bulb. Zones: 6-10. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Cut flowers, borders, attracts hummingbirds.
Coralbells – Heuchera spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: up to 36 inches. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun to shade. Uses: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds, containers, borders, drought and heat tolerant.
Daffodils – Narcissus spp. Type: Perennial bulb. Zones: 4-9. Height: 4-24 inches. Spacing: 4-6 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: borders, naturalizing, forcing, cut flowers. Daffodils
Dahlias – Dahlia spp. Type: Perennial tubers. Zones: 7-10. Height: up to 6 feet. Spacing: 24 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Cut flowers, containers, mass plantings.
Daylily – Hemerocallis spp. Type: Deciduous perennial. Zones: 2-10. Height: To 36 inches. Spacing: 15-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Borders, erosion control, slopes, mass palntings.
Dianthus, Pinks – Dianthus spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-10. Height: 14-18 inches. Spacing: 10-12 inches apart. Light: DianthusFull sun. Uses: Attracts butterflies, cut flowers, borders or edgers, fragrant flowers.
Evening Primrose – Oenothera spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: To 4 feet, depending on species. Spacing: 12-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Ground cover, flowers open in the evening.
False Indigo, Wild Indigo, Baptisia - Baptisia spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: To 5 feet, depending on species. Spacing: 12-36 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Borders, cut flower, dried flower, drought tolerant, attracts butterflies.
False Spirea – Astilbe spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: 18-24 inches. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Partial shade to shade. Uses: Edger, foreground plant, cut flower, dried flower, attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.
Feverfew, Painted Daisy - Tanacetum spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 8-36 inches, depending on variety. Spacing: 8-18 inches apart, depending on variety. Light: Full sun. Uses: Containers, bed and borders, butterfly attractant, cut flowers, drought tolerant.
Floss Flower, Ageratum* - Ageratum houstonianum. Type: Annual. Zones: All except very cold areas.  Height: 6-12”. Spacing: 6-8” apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Butterfly nectar plant.
Flowering Onions - Allium spp. Type: Perennial bulb. Zones: 3-9. Height: 1-4 feet, depending on variety. Spacing: 2-5 inches apart, depending on variety. Light: Full sun. Uses: Accent, mixed border, drought tolerant, nectar plant for butterflies.
Fountain Grasses – Pennisetum spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 6-11. Height: 1-5 feet, depending on variety. Spacing: 2-4 feet apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Borders, edgers, specimen, containers.
Foxglove – Digitalis spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-8. Height: 36-48 inches. Spacing: 12-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Flowering perennial in back of the landscape bed.
Fritillaria – Fritillaria spp. Type: Bulb. Zones: 3-9. Height: 8-40 inches, depending on variety. Spacing: 10-12 inches. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Mid spring bloomer for perennial gardens.
Geranium or Scented Geranium – Pelargonium spp. Type: Annual, perennial in zone 9. Zones: All. Height: 24-36 inches. Spacing: 12-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Teas, sachets, jellies, potpourris, vinegars, and desserts. 
Small Shell GingerGinger Lily – Alpinia spp. Alpinia mutica – Small Shell Ginger. Type: Perennial. Zones: 8-12. Height: 5-6 feet. Spacing: 4-6 feet. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Cut flower, foliage used in floral arrangements, specimen or container plant. Alpinia purpurata – Red Ginger. Type: Perennial. Zones: 8b-10. Height: 5-6 feet. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light: Red GingerFull sun to partial shade. Uses: Foliage and flowers are used in floral arrangements, containers, landscape beds. Alpinia zerumbet ‘Variegata’ – Variegated Shell Ginger. Type: Perennial. Zones: 8-12. Height: 6 feet. Spacing: 4-6 feet apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Containers, foliage and flowers are used in floral arrangements, specimen plant.
Ginger or Cooking Ginger – Zingiber officinale. Type: Perennial. Zones: 8-10. Height: 4 feet. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light: Partial shade. Uses: The root or rhizome is used in fish and meat dishes, to flavor teas and carbonated drinks, Chinese cooking.
 Variegated Ginger

Hardy Ice Plant - Delosperma spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-11. Height: 3-4 inches. Spacing: 9-12 inches. Light: Full sun. Uses: Ground cover for slopes, erosion control, rock garden, edger, attracts butterflies and hummingbirds, drought and heat tolerant.
Heartleaf Brunnera – Brunnera macrophylla. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-8. Height: 12-18 inches. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Partial shade to shade. Uses: Beds, borders, ground cover, containers.
Holly Fern, Shield Fern, Sword Fern – Polystichum spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-10. Height: 12-36 inches, depending on variety. Spacing: 9-12 inches apart. Light: Partial shade to shade. Uses: Borders, erosion control, slopes.
Iris* - Iris spp. Type: Perennial bulb or rhizome, depending on variety. Zones: 3-9. Height: 18-48 inches, depending on variety. Spacing: 8-10 inches apart. Light: Full sun to Irispartial shade. Uses: Perennial beds and borders, cut flowers
Lamb’s Ear - Stachys byzantine. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: 12-18 inches. Spacing: 10-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Borders, edger, containers, drought tolerant, rock garden.
LantanaLantana – Lantana camara, L. montevidensis. Lantana - Lantana camara 'Miss Huff'. Type: Perennial. Zones: 7-11. Height: 4 – 5’. Spacing: 3 – 5’ apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Butterfly attractant, heat and drought tolerant. Trailing Lantana - Lantana montevidensis. Type: Perennial. Zones: 8-10. Height: 18 – 24”. Spacing: 3 – 4’ apart, can spread to 5’. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Butterfly attractant, heat and drought tolerant.
Larkspur – Consolida spp. (A), Delphinium spp. (P). Type: Annual or perennial. Zones: All. Height: 12-36 inches. Spacing: 10-12 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Wild flower gardens, bed and borders, fresh cut flowers, dried flowers.
Lavender – Lavandula spp. Lavandula angustifolia. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-10. Height: 18-24”. Spacing: 12-18” apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Nectar plant for butterflies and hummingbirds, flowers can be dried or fresh cut, in potpourris, and sachets, in containers.
Lenten Rose, Christmas Rose, Hellebore - Helleborus spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 14-24 inches. Spacing: 12-22 inches apart. Light: Partial shade to shade. Uses: Beds, cut flowers, companion plants with ferns, hostas, heucheras in mixed bed.
Lungwort - Pulmonaria spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 12-18 inches. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Partial shade to shade. Uses: Beds and borders, ground cover, drought tolerant, companion plants with ferns, bleeding hearts, hostas.
Marigolds – Tagetes spp. Mexican Marigold Mint - Tagetes lucida. Type: Perennial. Zones: 8-10. Height: 24-30”. Spacing: 12-18” apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Mexican Marigold MintButterfly nectar and larval food plant, Mosquito repellent plant, fresh flowers are used in salads; leaves are used as a substitute for French tarragon.
Mexican Heather, Cigar Flower – Cuphea spp. Type: Shrub. Zones: 9-11, treated as an annual outside zone 9. Height: 24-36 inches. Spacing: 24-36 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Ground cover, mid-bed plantings, attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.
Miscanthus Grasses – Miscanthus spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-10. Height: 5-6 feet. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Shrub, privacy hedge, specimen plant, cut or dried flowers.
Muhly Grasses - Muhlenbergia spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 6-9. Height: 3 feet. Spacing: 3 feet apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Bed and borders, containers.
Mums - Chrysanthemum spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-9. Height: 12-36 inches. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Containers, mass plantings, cut flowers.
Oregano – Origanum spp. Greek Oregano - Origanum vulgare subsp. Hirtum. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-11. Height: 24 inches. Spacing: 12 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Leaves are used in Italian dishes, pizza, shellfish, egg dishes, beef, pork, and poultry dishes. Italian Oregano – Origanum vulgare. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-11. Height: 24 inches. Spacing: 8 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Leaves are used in Italian dishes, pizza, shellfish, egg dishes, beef, pork, and poultry dishes. Sweet Marjoram - Origanum majorana. Type: Perennial. Zones: 9-11, treated as an annual outside zone 9. Height: 12 to 18 inches. Spacing: 9 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Leaves are used in eggs, meats, rice, pastas, soups, vegetables.
Peonies – Paeonia spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-7. Height: 12-36 inches, depending on variety. Spacing: 18-36 inches apart. Light: Partial shade to shade. Uses: Back of the border bed, cut flowers.
Petunia – Petunia X hybrid 'Purple Wave'. Type: Annual. Zones: All except very cold areas.  Height: 4 – 6”. Spacing: For Petuniaa thick coverage, 12 – 15” apart, 3’ apart for regular coverage, plants will spread 3 – 5’. Light: Full sun. Uses: Butterfly attractant, heat and drought tolerant, border, edger, or in hanging baskets.
Phlox – Phlox spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: 2-36 inches, depending on variety. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: bed and borders, ground cover, attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.
Poppies – Papaver spp. Type: Annual. Zones: 2-11. Height: 1-4 feet. Spacing: 6-12 inches. Light: Full sun. Uses: Beds and borders, containers.
Prostrate Rosemary - Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostratus’. Type: Perennial shrub or groundcover. Height: 12-18”. RosemartSpacing: 2 feet apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Additional Uses: The leaves are used in lamb and fish dishes, butterfly nectar plant, Mosquito repellent plant, and drought tolerant plant.
Rosemary – Rosmarinus officinalis. Type: Perennial shrub. Zones: 8-11. Height: 4 feet. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: The leaves are used in lamb and fish dishes, drought tolerant plant, and butterfly nectar plant.
Russian Sage - Perovskia atriplicifolia. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 3-5 feet. Spacing: 24-36 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Containers, bed and borders, cut flowers, butterfly attractant.
Salvia and Sages - Salvia spp. Autumn Sage - Salvia greggii 'Maraschino'. Type: Perennial. Zones: 7-10.  Height: 3’ – 4’. Spacing: 18” – 24” apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Butterfly and hummingbird attractant, accent, cut flower, herb and perennial garden. Mexican Sage - Salvia leucantha. Type: Perennial. Zones: 8-10. Height: 2 – 4’. Spacing: 3 – 5’ apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Butterfly attractant, and drought tolerant. Pineapple Sage – Salvia elegans. Type: Perennial. Zones: 8-11.  Height: 3 - 4 feet. Spacing: 3 – 4 feet apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Blooms red flowers in spring, summer, and fall. The leaves when crushed smell and taste like fresh pineapple. Uses: The fresh leaves can be used in drinks and salads. The leaves can be used in hot or cold drinks, and the flowers and leaves are used chopped in salads. Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds to the garden. Sage - Salvia officinalis. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-10. Height: 3 feet. Spacing: 12-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Leaves are used in stuffing, meat dishes, egg dishes, salads, soups, stews, and vegetables, accent in borders.
Sedge - Carex spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 6-36 inches, depending on variety. Spacing: 12-36 inches apart, depending on variety. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Beds and borders, containers.
Sedums, Stonecrops – Sedum spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-11. Height: 2-24 inches. Spacing: 4-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Containers, slopes, rock gardens, cracks and crevices, butterfly attractant.
Siberian Iris - Iris sibirica. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: 12-36 inches. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Ponds, streams, or boggy areas, cut flowers.
SnapdragonsSnapdragons - Antirrhinum majus. Type: Annual. Zones: All. Height: 6-36 inches depending on variety. Spacing: 8-12 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Cut flowers, beds and borders.
Solomon’s Seal – Polygonatum spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: 24-48 inches. Spacing: 18-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Shady gardens.
Spanish Bluebells - Hyacinthoides hispanica. Type: Perennial bulb. Zones: 3-8. Height: 12-18 inches. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Cut flowers, beds and borders, edger.
Spider Flower - Cleome hassleriana. Type: Annual. Zones: 2-11. Height: 3-6 feet. Spacing: 12-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Beds, borders, large containers, attracts butterflies, hummingbirds, and birds to the garden.
Spirea* - Spiraea spp. Type: Deciduous shrub. Zones: 4-9. Height: 12-36 inches. Spacing: 3-5 feet apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Foundation planting, attracts butterflies, hummingbirds, and birds.
St. John’s Wort - Hypericum spp. Type: Ground cover. Zones: 5-11. Height: 12-24 inches. Spacing: 24-36 inches apart. Light: Partial shade. Uses: Ground cover, mass plantings, edgers, borders.
Swamp Sunflower, Narrow-Leaf Sunflower - Helianthus angustifolius. Type: Perennial. Zones: 6-9. Height: To 6 feet. Spacing: 18-24 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Wild flower gardens, attracts native butterflies, mixed perennial beds.
Tansy - Tanacetum vulgare. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: 3-4 feet. Spacing: 12-18” apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Nectar food plant for butterflies, driedTansy flower.
Thyme – Thymus spp. Lemon Thyme – Thymus x citriodorus. Type: Perennial. Height: 12 inches. Spacing: 12 inches apart. Light Requirements: Full sun. Light purple flowers in summer. Wonderful Lemon scent when leaves are crushed or walked upon. Additional Uses: All leaves have a distinct lemon flavor that can be used in cooking. Attracts Butterflies and Hummingbirds to the garden. Summer Thyme – Thymus vulgaris. Type: Perennial. Height: 6 – 12 inches. Spacing: 6 – 12 inches apart. Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade. Blooms lilac to purple flowers in summer. Additional Uses: All leaves are used in cooking. Attracts butterflies to the garden. All thyme plants can be used as an alternative ground cover.
Tickseed - Coreopsis spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-10. Height: From 6 to 36 inches depending on variety. Spacing: 9-14 Tickseedinches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Dwarf variety can be used as borders or ground covers, beds and borders, attracts butterflies, cut flower.
Verbena – Verbena spp. Verbena Canadensis ‘Homestead’ – Homestead Purple Verbena. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-10. Height: 12 inches. Spacing: 3-4 feet apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Ground cover for hills, slopes, retaining walls, rock Verbenagardens, attracts butterflies.
Veronica, Speedwell – Veronica spp. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 4-12 inches. Spacing: 8-12 inches apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Ground cover, borders, attracts butterflies and hummingbirds, drought tolerant.
Vinca, Periwinkle - Catharanthus roseus. Type: Perennial/annual. Zones: 9-11, perennial, outside zone 9 treated as annual. Height: 24 inches. Spacing: 10-12 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Containers, bed, borders, butterfly attractant.
Whirling Butterflies - Gaura lindheimeri. Type: Perennial. Zones: 5-10. Height: 36 inches. Spacing: 18-20 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Containers, beds and borders, attracts butterflies, drought tolerant.
Wormwood – Artemisia spp. Roman Wormwood - Artemisia pontica. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-10. Height: 18-24”. Spacing: 12” apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Nectar and larval food plant for butterflies, drought tolerant plant, floral arranging, bed and borders. Wormwood - Artemisia absinthium. Type: Perennial. Zones: 4-9. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 18-24” apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Nectar and larval food plant for butterflies, drought tolerant plant. Wormwood - Artemisia 'Powis Castle'. Type: Perennial. Zones: 9-11. Height: 2-3 feet. Spacing: 3 feet apart. Light: Full sun to partial shade. Uses: Nectar and larval food plant for butterflies, drought tolerant plant, foliage used in fresh or dried arrangements.
Yarrow – Achillea millefolium, A. filipendulina. Type: Perennial. Zones: 3-9. Height: 15-36 inches. Spacing: 12-15 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Cut or dried flowers, butterfly attractant, bed, borders.
Zinnias* - Zinnia spp. Type: Annual. Zones: All. Height: 12-18 inches. Spacing: 12-18 inches apart. Light: Full sun. Uses: Beds, borders, cut flower, containers, butterfly attractant.

Photography and digital images are ©Cheryl Ann Meola 2013. All Rights Reserved. All photographs and digital images displayed in this article are for viewing purposes only and cannot be duplicated. ©Cheryl Ann Meola 2013. Texas Certified Nursery Professional #1282.

Saturday, March 23, 2013

Fertilizers For Southern Plants

Fertilizers For Southern Plants
Fertilizers are the vitamins or the essential elements that a plant needs to grow and stay healthy. The soil, atmosphere, and water usually provide the plant with these essential nutrients, but there are times when the soil is generally nutrient deficient and in this case a fertilizer is essential. There are sixteen essential elements to plant nutrition. These elements are separated into two categories, macronutrients and micronutrients. The macronutrients are: oxygen [O], carbon [C], hydrogen [H], nitrogen [N], phosphorus [P], potassium [K], Calcium [Ca], magnesium [Mg], sulfur [S] and are required by the plant in large amounts. Oxygen, carbon and hydrogen are provided to the plant by the atmosphere and water. Required by the plant in small amounts are the micronutrients, which are: iron [Fe], manganese [Mn], zinc [Zn], baron [B], copper [Cu], molybdenum [Mo], and chlorine [Cl]. These elements are the building blocks to plant nutrition and health.

There are several types of fertilizers on the market today that are especially formulated for specific plants and to mention a few, there are Azalea fertilizers, Hibiscus Fertilizers, Palm Fertilizers, and many others. Let’s say you go to your local nursery or garden center to purchase the recommended fertilizer for your plant and the item is not in stock, or even available in your local. What do you do now? Fertilizers are formulated by percentage ratios such as 6-6-6, which is a 1-1-1 ratio or what is called a balanced fertilizer. As long as you get as close to fertilizer ratio as possible the plant will be happy.

When applying fertilizer please follow the package recommendations to how much should be applied and how frequently. Over fertilizing your plants does not help the plant in fact can cause more harm than good because a plant will only take up the fertilizer that it needs. Depending on the plant over fertilizing can cause a decrease in plant health, can lead to a decline, or eventually death; and in some species of plants, over fertilizing can cause an increase in insects. Fertilize newly planted plants after you see new growth appear.

Listed below are a few southern plants and the recommended fertilizers.

Allamanda – Allamanda’s are moderate feeders, requiring a balanced fertilizer with applications 3 to 4 times a year. After establishment water only during periods of drought. Allamanda PlantAllamanda pictured right.

Bougainvillea – Bougainvillea’s are heavy feeders and a Bougainvillea fertilizer should have a low phosphorous [P], which is the middle number and a higher analysis of potassium [K], which is the last number. The recommended fertilizers for the Bougainvillea are 6-8-10, 12-4-18, and Bougainvillia Plant17-7-10, or you can use a fertilizer that is recommended for Hibiscus Plants. Bougainvillea pictured left.

Firebush: Hamelia patens – Firebush is gaining popularity with gardeners and landscapers alike due to the plant’s drought tolerance after establishment; the plant attracts butterflies and hummingbirds to the garden, and requires little to no maintenance. Firebush requires little to no fertilizer, but can be fertilized twice a year in early spring and early summer with a 12-4-8 fertilizer or a fertilizer that has a 3-1-2 ratio blend. FirebushFirebush pictured right.

Firecracker Plant: Russelia equisetiformis – Firecracker plant is very drought tolerant after establishment in the landscape and is not picky about the soil it grows in. The plant attracts butterflies and hummingbirds to the garden.   Firecracker PlantFirecracker Plant requires very little fertilizer and you can apply a balanced fertilizer in the early spring and mid-summer. Firecracker Plant pictured left.

Hibiscus - Hibiscus are heavy feeders and a Hibiscus fertilizer should have a low phosphorous [P], which is the middle number and a higher analysis of potassium [K], which is the last number. The recommended fertilizers for the Hibiscus are 10-4-12, 9-3-12, or 12-4-18. Osmocote 17-6-10 + minors or Osmocote 18-6-12 are also recommended for Hibiscus and are a time-release fertilizer. Hibiscus plants attract Hummingbirds and Butterflies.

Homestead Purple Verbena: Verbena canadensis 'Homestead Purple' – There are two types of Verbenas, annual and perennial, but both types of Verbenas require the same fertilizer, and do extremely well under drought conditions and summer heat. Both types of Verbenas require a well-drained soil or plant in an area that does not collect water during heavy rains. Fertilize Verbenas once a year with a balanced plant food. Homestead Purple VerbenaHomestead Purple Verbena pictured right.

Ixora – Ixoras require an acid soil and an acid fertilizer. When Ixoras are planted in alkaline soil the plant suffers from Iron and Manganese deficiencies. When planting Ixoras amend the soil with Miracle-Gro Azalea soil or Miracle-Gro Rose soil and top dress with mulch. The recommended fertilizer for Ixoras are the same that are recommended for Gardenias, Azaleas, and Rhododendrons which should contain the minor elements, or a fertilizer recommended for Palm trees, or a fertilizer recommended for Hibiscus. Apply fertilizer 3 to 4 times a year. Do you drink coffee or tea? If so, the used ground can be recycled back into the soil under your acid loving plants such as Ixoras.

Lantana: Lantana camara – Lantana loves the summer heat and is extremely drought tolerant after the plant is established. In the south, Lantana is a perennial that comes back in the spring and should be pruned back after the danger of frost is gone. Lantana requires very little fertilizer and can be Lantana Plantfertilized very lightly with a balanced fertilizer such as 6-6-6, 8-8-8, or 10-10-10 in early spring and mid-summer. Lantanas attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Lantana Plant pictured left.

Palm Trees – require a 3-1-3 ratio fertilizer such as 12-4-12, or 13-3-13, or 15-5-15 at a slow-release or a control-release formulation. The fertilizer should also, contain minor elements or micro-elements. Broadcast the fertilizer around the root zone and past the drip line of the palm fronds.

Pride-of Barbados: Caesalpinia pulcherrima – Pride-of Barbados is in the Fabaceae family, (Legumes) and has a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria called Rhizobia. The Rhizobia (bacteria) takes nitrogen from the air and changes the nitrogen to nitrates, a form of nitrogen that is immediately available to the plant’s roots. Because of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria, if you need to fertilize the plant use a low nitrogen fertilizer. The plant is very drought tolerant after establishment and grows well in a wide range of soils from alkaline to acidic.

Turk’s Cap: Malvaviscus arboreus – Turk’s Cap is in the Malvaceae Family, the same family the Hibiscus plant is in. Hibiscuses are heavy feeders and a Hibiscus fertilizer Turk's Capshould have a low phosphorous [P], which is the middle number and a higher analysis of potassium [K], which is the last number. The recommended fertilizers for the Hibiscus are 10-4-12, 9-3-12, or 12-4-18. Osmocote 17-6-10 + minors or Osmocote 18-6-12 are also recommended for Hibiscus and are a time-release fertilizer. Turk’s Cap is more drought tolerant than the tropical Hibiscus and attracts Hummingbirds and Butterflies. Turk's Cap pictured right.
Cedar Pet Food Containers 
Hibiscus And More announces Let’s Get Ready for Spring Sale. All Handcrafted Cedar Planters, Boxes, and Cubes are 30% off. Click Here To Purchase. Cedar Pet Food Containers pictured left.

Hibiscus Fertilizer on Sale Now at 30% off. Click To Purchase. Hibiscus Fertilizer pictured right.

©Cheryl Ann Meola 2013.  Texas Certified Nursery Professional (TCNP) #1282.
 Hibiscus Fertilizer

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Planting and Growing Tomato Plants

TomatoesPlanting and Growing Tomato Plants

As the weather warms, we gardeners start thinking about gardening again. With this in mind I would like to mention the wonderful benefits of growing tomatoes.
Home-grown tomatoes have a richer, fuller, and better taste than store bought since you pick them yourself. Home-grown tomatoes are easy and inexpensive to grow as well. Growing tomatoes has a lot of appeal: it can involve the entire family from the little ones to the teens. As well as being an educational tool, the time the family spends in the garden is quality time spent together, and can give one a sense of pride. For gardener’s who live in a condo, apartment, or townhome tomatoes can be grown in a container.

Choosing a Location: Choose an area that gets 5 - 6 hours of full sun; and if, you have an area that receives more than 6 hours of sunlight that’s all right, too.

Choosing a Container(s): Pick a container that is 14 inches or larger, and I would like to suggest when growing tomatoes to put one plant per container. All Hand-Crafted Cedar Planters are 30% Off. Click Here To Purchase Cedar Planters.

Choosing Potting Soil: When choosing a potting soil there are several commercial potting soils available, and choosing one is a matter of your gardening preferences, some of the choices are inorganic verses organic, with moisture control or without moisture control, with timed-release fertilizer or without fertilizer. Some potting soils are especially formulated for vegetables and can be used as a potting soil in containers or a soil amendment to your vegetable garden plot.

Choosing a Fertilizer: When choosing a fertilizer there are several commercial fertilizers that are available, and choosing one is a matter of your gardening preferences, some of the choices are water soluble, granular, time-release, slow-release, organic, or inorganic. Choose a fertilizer that is formulated for vegetable plants and include the minor-element calcium. Current research has discovered that calcium is an important minor-element in fertilizers, especially for vegetable fertilizers. The research discovered that a lack of calcium in the soil is the cause of Blossom End Rot in tomatoes and other vegetables. When your vegetable fertilizer does not include the minor-element of calcium you can use one of the following: Crushed eggshells, Calcium Supplement Pills, (for people, but works just as well on plants), Nutri-Cal, Epsom Salts, Gypsum, or Powdered Lime.

The eggshells can be put into a blender or food processor to be crushed and mixed until the eggshells are a dry powder. Apply to plant(s) every two weeks. Eggshells contain 95 percent calcium carbonate.

The over the counter calcium supplement pills we take every day can be used to increase the calcium levels in your tomato plants. Use 2 tablets per plant mixed with a gallon of water. The tablets can be crushed or just dissolve thoroughly in water. The calcium water mixture can be added to your water soluble fertilizer.

Nutri-Cal is a liquid calcium supplement that can be purchased at most garden centers that is sprayed on the tomato plant. For good results please follow package directions.

Epsom salts has been recommended to relieve calcium deficiencies in soils and is highly recommended by organic gardeners. Apply 1 tablespoon, dry Epsom salts per plant and water in thoroughly after applying; or mix 2 tablespoons per gallon of water and water the tomatoes with the mixture.

To increase the calcium levels of soils that are more alkaline use Gypsum (calcium sulfate), and follow package directions. For soils that are more acidic use Powdered Lime (calcium carbonate). This product is also labeled as Calcitic Lime, Dolomitic Lime and will increase the soil’s alkalinity.

Choosing an Insecticide: When choosing an insecticide there are several available at your local garden center and choosing one is a matter of your gardening preferences, and while I was growing tomatoes I had an IPM (Integrated Pest Management) approach method. I would only use Safer Soaps or Horticultural Oils on all the tomatoes that I grew, and realistically I hardly had to spray the tomatoes at all. I was constantly watching for any insect or worm that would start eating my prize tomatoes, and when I did see one I would simply dispose of the insect.

Choosing a Vegetable Support: Most tomato plants will need to be staked or will need a vegetable cage to support the plant. Put the tomato cage or vegetable cage around the plant shortly after planting.

Watering: Of all the ingredients that I have mentioned for tomato gardening success, water, is the most important to successful tomatoes. The soil for your plants will need to be consistently moist at all times, and the water source should be city water or treated water. This is one of the reasons for E. coil outbreaks by vegetable growers in past years; the vegetables that were recalled received untreated water during the growing process. More gardeners are starting to grow their own vegetables this year versus last year due to the E. coli outbreaks in store-bought produce. Just another reason to start growing your own vegetables, you supply the water, you supply the insecticide, and you know exactly what ingredients went into your vegetables. For states that are currently under water restrictions, you can water your food crops, personal food garden, or personal vegetable garden without penalty. Wash all vegetables before eating or cooking.

Planting Tomato Plants: Always plant your tomato plants deeper than the original soil line, even if you grow your tomatoes from seed. When you are ready to plant your tomato plants remove two to three sets of the lower leaves or six leaves total and plant the tomato plant that deep in the soil. You just do this withBeans and Cherry Tomatoes tomatoes and the reason for this procedure is that tomatoes will establish more roots along the stem where you removed the leaves, and tomatoes require a lot more water than the other vegetables, and tomatoes are one vegetable that are heavy feeders, i.e. tomatoes require a steady supply of fertilizer.

An article in Chemically Speaking, January 2009 on honeybees and crop yield that was published may entice my readers to plant more than just a vegetable garden this spring. The article states that planting more flowers to attract honeybees will help plants defend themselves against attacks from caterpillars. The study suggests that this could lead to a new biological control method to try.

Put on your gardening gloves and reap the rewards and benefits of a spring vegetable garden. Tastier vegetables than store bought that you harvest on your own. As a vegetable gardener you know the ingredients, and there is nothing more rewarding than tasting the “vegetables” of your labors.

All photographs and digital images are ©Cheryl Ann Meola 2007. All Rights Reserved. All photographs and digital images displayed in this article are for viewing purposes only and cannot be duplicated.